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Recovering in Solitude

During the difficult times in our lives, its always helpful to have someone in our corner for support. However, some of us aren’t lucky enough to always have a support system at hand. Addiction can rob us of our loved ones, and make getting close to others difficult. This doesn’t mean that you can’t recover independently, though. In fact, some of the most meaningful self-discovery you’ll experience is the product of getting to know yourself when separated from the outside world. This is the opportunity to truly find yourself, and there are some great things you can do in this time to make some real, meaningful discoveries.

Explore the Arts

Many find that diving into literature or music is great way to distract yourself from the painful parts of recovery. Losing yourself in a good book is a great way to experience new feelings and discover things about yourself you may have never noticed, while simultaneously projecting your attention away from cravings or addiction. Music too can offer a beautiful escape. Music can be so effective at providing stress relief and a calming atmosphere that music therapy is fast becoming one of the most popular forms of therapy in addiction aftercare. However, you don’t always have to take a spectator seat to the arts to enjoy yourself in recovery.

Hobbies

We talk a lot on this blog about the efficacy of hobbies in recovery. Not only can learning something new stimulate the brain, but you’ll learn a lot about yourself in the process. Learning new things takes dedication and effort; specifically, effort that is redirected from addiction and drugs into something meaningful and productive. Learning an instrument, writing, or even playing sports can be a great way to stimulate mind and body after a debilitating addiction. Activities like these can also help you get out, explore, and try new things, which are essential in recovery.

You Don’t Have To Be Alone

Exploring hobbies and the arts can be great for self discovery, but it can also help you make great connections. Recovery may be possible alone, but it’s not entirely recommended. Spend some of your time with others, whether it be at 12 step meetings or even just hanging out with friends. Ideally, you’ll be able to split your time between yourself and your loved one. When balanced correctly, your recovery will be as rewarding as it is fun.